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FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Softcover) (Aug 2004) Random House

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FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Softcover)
Date: Aug 2004
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Publisher:  randomhouse.com

Description
George Pérez is mentioned in Chapter 7 of this Novel.

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    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Hardcover) (Sep 2004)
    Random House

    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Softcover) (Aug 2004)
    Random House
    xxx


    News: Isabella Reviews 'Atomsmashers'

    October 04, 2004 06:53 pm
     From COMICS BUYER'S GUIDE #1598 (Nov 2004)
    TONY'S TIPS: Finding Justice in Comics
    written by Tony Isabella
    published in COMICS BUYER'S GUIDE #1598 (Nov 2004)
    www.comicsbuyersguide.com


    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Hardcover) (Sep 2004)
    Random House

    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Softcover) (Aug 2004)
    Random House
    Contemporary authors write about their favorite comic books in Give Our Regards to the Atomsmashers! (Pantheon, $24.95), edited by Sean Howe. The 17 essays range from discussions of Little Nemo in Slumberland to Jim Woodring with stops along the way that include Tintin, Reuben Flagg, Adam Warlock, NoMan and Steve Ditko.

    In effect, this anthology might be the most erudited comics fanzine of all time.

    My reactions to the essays generally depended on two things: how well the authors' love for the comics they were writing about came through and how much I shared their love. Johnathan Lethem, whose novel The Fortress of Solitude made use of comics tenets tells of childhood friendships in relation to the comics his friends and he read. I could relate to that; even with comics fanzines, conventions, and online forums, I have never been able to recapture the excitement of talking about the new comics of my youth with a few and special friends of mine who also loved them.

    Steve Erickson writes compellingly of American Flagg! and Gary Giddins does the same for Classic Illustrated. Brad Meltzer tells of his love for the doomed Terra in The New Teen Titans, making a case, however unplanned, that his Identity Crisis can be blamed on the childhood trauma he suffered at the hands of Marv Wolfman and George Pérez.

    (I'm just kidding. I think.)

    [ Read more in COMICS BUYER'S GUIDE #1598 (Nov 2004) ]

    News: Pérez Mentioned in "The Fortress of Solitude" Novel

    September 12, 2004 10:48 pm
     From USA Today
    Excerpt from 'The Fortress of Solitude'
    Posted 9/8/2003 11:37 AM
    By Jonathan Lethem

    FROM CHAPTER 7

    (excerpt)


    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Hardcover) (Sep 2004)
    Random House

    FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE (Softcover) (Aug 2004)
    Random House
    It was the library where they finally spoke. Dylan and Arthur Lomb's two homerooms had been deposited there together for a period, the school librarian covering some unexplained absence of teachers for an afternoon, a blip in the routine nobody cared about anyway. Most kids sent to the library never arrived there, ended up outside the building instead, taking the word as a euphemism for class dismissed. So the I.S. 293 library was drab but peaceful, an eddy of calm. Below a poster advertising A Hero Ain't Nothin' But a Sandwich, a book the library didn't actually offer, Dylan placed himself against a wall and flipped open issue number two of the Marvel Comics adaptation of Logan's Run. As the period ticked away glacially, Arthur Lomb buzzed him twice, squinting to see the title of the comic, then pursing lips in false concentration as he mimed browsing the half—empty shelves nearby, before stepping close enough for Dylan to hear him speak in an angry, clenched whisper.

    "That guy George Perez can't draw Farrah Fawcett to save his life."

    This was a startling allusion to several bodies of knowledge simultaneously. Dylan could only glare, his curiosity mingled with the certainty that he and Arthur Lomb were more objectionable, more unpardonable, together than apart. Up close Arthur Lomb had a blinky agitated quality to his features which made Dylan himself want to knock him down. His face seemed to reach for something, his features like a grasping hand. Dylan wondered if there might be a pair of glasses tucked in the background somewhere, perhaps in a side pocket of the monumental blue backpack.

    Dylan hurried the comic book into his binder. He'd bought it on Court Street at luchtime and debated allowing it to be seen inside the school, a breach of general good sense. It was a lousy comic, though, stiff with fidelity to the movie, and Dylan had decided he wouldn't care anymore than he'd be surprised if it was taken away. This, a conversation with his homely double, wasn't the price he'd expected to pay. But Arthur Lomb seemed to sense the dent he'd made in Dylan's attention and pressed on.

    He smirked again at the comic book where it had vanished into the binder.

    "Seen it?"

    "What?"

    "Logan's Run."

    (Expletive) you looking at? Dylan wanted to shriek at Arthur Lomb, before it was too late, before Dylan succumbed to his loneliness and allowed himself to meet Arthur, the other white boy.

    "Not yet," Dylan said instead.

    "Farrah Fawcett is a fox."


    From Amazon.com
  • Hardcover: 528 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.33 x 9.52 x 6.50
  • Publisher: Doubleday; (September 16, 2003)
  • ISBN: 0385500696
  • Paperback: 528 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.94 x 8.04 x 5.24
  • Publisher: Vintage; (August 24, 2004)
  • ISBN: 0375724885
  • In-Print Editions: Paperback | Hardcover | Hardcover (Large Print) | Audio Cassette (Unabridged) | e-book (Adobe Reader) | e-book (Microsoft Reader) | Audio Download (Audible.com) | All Editions
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