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SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW? (1997) DC Comics

cover:  Curt Swan
Murphy Anderson
SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW?
ISBN: 1-56389-315-0
Date: 1997
Cover Price:  $5.95
Publisher: dccomics.com

Description
Collects: 

From Vu

    The Time Has Come!
    Introduction by Paul Kupperberg

    (excerpt) 

    To ink the last Superman stories his editorial reign, Julie Schwartz called on THE TEEN TITANS co-creator George Perez for Part One. "George heard I was giving up Superman and had always wanted to ink a Curt Swan story," Julie recalls. Perez agrees, "It was a dream come true for me to finally get to ink Curt Swan's pencils, especially on his last Superman story, and to work with Alan Moore. Like everyone else, I grew up reading Curt's Superman, so it was thrilling to be working with him on just that level alone. To work with him on this story, which was a bit of history in the making, made it even more special."

 

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    SDCC '08 - More on Gaiman-Batman with Dan DiDio
    28 July 2008, 8:07PM CDT by vu (vu sleeper)
    From www.newsarama.com

    SDCC '08 - More on Gaiman-Batman with Dan DiDio
    By Matt Brady
    posted: 27 July 2008 04:27 pm ET

    As announced in the “DC Nation: One Weekend Later” panel on Sunday at San Diego Comic-Con, and exclusively on video at Newsarama right here , Neil Gaiman and Andy Kubert will team in January of 2009 for a Batman story entitled, “Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?”

    The slide announcing the project and team was met with loud applause at the panel, and while seeing Gaiman return to comics is a big deal, for DC fans, the announcement is something of a bigger deal.

    Why? The title – it’s an obvious homage/reference to 1986’s “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?” written by Alan Moore, with art by Curt Swan, George Perez and Kurt Schaffenberger. The two issue story, which spanned Superman and Action Comics was a loving tribute by Moore to Superman, and is easily among Superman fans top five all time Superman stories.

    Essentially, Moore’s story closed the chapter on an entire age of Superman, ending the character’s Silver Age continuity in preparation for the reboot helmed by John Byrne. Is history going to repeat itself in Gotham City?

    [ Read more www.newsarama.com ]

    Comics! 52, GLC, and JSA!
    News Sun, 14 Jan 2007 01:34:59 CST Vu
    From stevereads.blogspot.com

      SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW? (1997)
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    (excerpt)

    'Kingdom Come' of course being the fantastic 'imaginary story' of a future DC universe in which the super-heroes have retired from the world stage and super-powered anarchy reigns unchecked. That graphic novel stands as one of the six greatest superhero books ever made (and the single best portrait of Superman - in words and pictures - ever made, with the possible exception of 'Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?' by Alan Moore, Curt Swan, and George Perez). In this possible future, we glimpse this grown-up version of Cosmic Boy in the backgrounds, and maybe we wondered what his story was (disregarding, of course, whatever story was given in any of the million pages of 'Kingdom Come's supporting materials over the years and concentrating only on what's in the book itself).



    Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow - Walmart Exclusive
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    From Vu
    This Superman Returns/Justice League: Justice on Trial bundle is a pretty good deal, not only do you get the Superman Returns movie, but the bonus JL DVD. Plus for $2.97, you can download the movie (see more prices at www.pocket-lint.co.uk).

    The best part is: it also comes with a reprint of SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW! I could not find a photograph or scan of this pocket sized comic book, so if you have a copy, I would like to see a scan of it.

    >>>


    SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW? (Wal-Mart) (28 Nov 2006)
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    $19.96
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    Exclusive includes "Superman Returns" and Bonus Item. "Superman Returns" - He's back. A hero for our millennium. And not a moment too soon, because during the five years (much longer in movie-fan years!) Superman sought his home planet, things changed on his adopted planet. Nations moved on without him. Lois Lane now has a son, a fiancee and a Pulitzer for "Why The World Doesn't Need Superman." And Lex Luthor has a plan that will destroy millions - no, billions - of lives. Filmmaker Bryan Singer ("X-Men") gives the world the "Superman" it needs, honoring the legend everyone loves while taking it in a powerful new direction. Brandon Routh proves a perfect choice to wear the hero's cape, leading a top cast that includes Kate Bosworth as Lois and Kevin Spacey as Lex. And the thrills from a sky-grapple with a tumbling jumbo jet to a continent-convulsing showdown - redefine Wow. "I'm always around," Superman tells Lois. You'll be glad he is.

    Packaging Type is Side-by-Side; "Superman Returns" (Widescreen Version)


     July 20, 2003 | Alan Moore Interview in CBA
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    >>>
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      SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW? (1997)
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    CBA: It took me some time to finally read your work. I would go into comic stores and people were always saying, "Alan Moore this, Alan Moore that," and the talk made it sound like you were trendy and I usually been disappointed buying into trendy stuff. But when I finally read "The Anatomy Lesson" [SWAMP THING #21] I thought, "No f*cking way! This guy's putting hallucinogenics into mainstream comics!" [laughs]

    Alan: But it wouldn't have worked if I wasn't a traditionalist. None of this radical work would occur to anyone who wasn't a traditionalist. Unless I understood the tradition of Swamp Thing, how could I ever come up with exactly the right sort of twist to put in them?

    When I got my crack at doing Superman stories, my last two stories for Julie, I didn't intend to be irreverent or take the character to some ultimate extreme. I used elements from earlier stories and certainly stretched them, but for instance, I loved Krypto. I knew Krypto was going to be thrown out with all the other garbage in the next issue when John Byrne took over, but at the same time I thought I would try to get the readers to appreciate the good stuff they were losing. I tried to write a Krypto scene that would make grown men weep, and it did. I got some good reports on that death of Krypto. It is okay that we can love this stuff, and I do.

    CBA: Did you art direct that?

    Alan: This is the only comic book cover [ACTION COMICS #583] I've ever got paid doing the layouts for. That was a delight. I got to work with Kurt Schaffenberger, inked by George Pérez.

     April 11, 2003 | Curt Swan Book
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    Topic: CSN @ NEWSARAMA - CURT SWAN: A LIFE IN COMICS
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    (excerpt)

    Curt Swan: A Life in Comics is a most impressive volume; not only has Zeno selected an amazing array of Swan art from his lengthy career—work that has been cleaned up and reproduced with loving care to show off Swan’s skills in the best possible light—but he has supplemented that work with scores of unpublished pieces, pencil drawings, sketches, commissioned drawings, layouts, rarely-seen cartoons and non-comics work, and more. The pencil work in particular conveys the strength of Swan’s artistry in knowing how to convey maximum impact with no wasted lines, no cluttered layout, no pretentious visual gimmickry.


    (Vu: As you know, George Pérez was a big fan of Curt Swan's humanistic approach to drawing Superman. It was a dream come true when he was asked to inked Swan in part two of "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" story in SUPERMAN #423.)
     January 4, 2003 | Superman & Swan in CBM #97
    From COMIC BOOK MARKETPLACE #97 (Dec 2002)
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    (excerpt)

    Swan's Superman seldom expressed feelings of melancholy; rarely did he brood; yet there was often an air of palpable sadness about him, taken to the extreme in 1961's "The Death of Superman!" (inked by Stan Kaye), above and in Swan's last Superman story in '86, inked by George Pérez, below.

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