JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR #33 (Nov 2001) TwoMorrows Publishing

cover:  Jack Kirby
Erik Larsen
Bruce Timm
JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR #33
Date: Nov 2001
Cover Price: $9.95
Publisher: twomorrows.com

Description
November 2001 - 84 pages - Tabloid Format 40th Anniversary of the Fantastic Four 

This is the one readers have been asking for since #9—the second all Fantastic Four issue! To celebrate the FF's 40th Anniversary, all the stops are pulled out, showing 40 pages of Kirby's powerful, uninked FF pencils! We've got cover inks by Erik Larsen (plus a new Larsen interview), and due to overwhelming demand, Bruce Timm makes a return engagement as a TJKC cover inker! Plus, nearly every writer and artist who worked on the FF after Lee & Kirby has been tracked down, and asked what their favorite Kirby issue of FF was, and why! There are also regular columnists Mark Evanier and Adam McGovern, and a new installment in Mike Gartland's "Failure to Communicate" series dealing with Kirby's final year on FF! And if that's still not enough for you, there's a new interview with Stan "The Man" Lee! It's the ultimate issue, showcasing Kirby art at nearly full-size in the new king-size format! Don't miss it!

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    JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR #33 (Nov 2001)
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     February 10, 2002 | Site Update
    From Vu
    It should be noted that the two George Pérez answers and questions are founded on page 24, with a little FF checklist that he's involved in:
    GEORGE PEREZ
    (Artist on Fantastic Four #164-167, 170-172, 176-178, 184-188, 191-192.)
    This does not include George as cover artist (FF #183, 194-197), as well as annuals.
     February 8, 2002 | KIRBY COLLECTOR #33
    From Tony Lorenz
    I just got the new issue of the KIRBY COLLECTOR #33, man I love this mag!!!! Well, anyway it has a short interview (two questions) to just about everyone that has worked on the Fantastic Four, and George is included. Here's George's questions and answers:

    What Lee/Kirby of Fantastic Four is your favorite and why?
    I think it would probably be the introduction of the Inhumans. There just something that I enjoyed about The Inhumans and that was early Kirby with Sinnott. I think that was one of Joe Sinnott's best inking phases on Kirby so I think that definitely has to rank up there. Although there are others that I enjoyed that are not getting proper attention because I only have to name one. The second you asked the question I just thought of the cover and The Inhuman introduction.

    How would you say the Lee/Kirby issues influenced your work on the FF?
    The entire sense of super-hero dynamics was definitely taken from Lee and Kirby. In the case of the Fantastic Four, some of the best supporting characters in the Marvel Universe were introduced in that book, from Dr Doom to Galactus to Silver Surfer. It was a surprise every time you turned the page when those two guys were working in their prime. It was part of my DNA. I was so influenced by that book; with the exception of minor costuming details, it didn't even require me to do referencing with the pages I front of me. I was pretty much able to do it on my own, but that was because of a lot of years of referencing. Little did I realize how much my initial reading of the comic would be part of my learning experience in comics.




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